West Wicklow Bookshelf

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Seeing the Woods AND the Trees

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© The Publisher

Full title: If trees could talk: Wicklow’s trees and woodlands over four centuries

Creator / Author: Michael Carey

Item Type / Page count: Book / 290p

When Published: 2009

Publisher / Place of Publication: COFORD National Council for Forest Research and Development / Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2.

About: Wicklow is the most forested county in Ireland. This book, which is aimed at a general readership, looks at the historical background to this. It also details the many uses of timber and timber products over the centuries. As well as being a history of Wicklow’s woodlands, it can also be seen somewhat as a history of rural Wicklow itself.

ID number(s): 1902696646

Chapters:  Acknowledgements – Preface – [Section 1. The Woodland Resource] – Historic background – How big was the woodland resource? – Gathering evidence on past woodland cover: Archaeology, Pollen analysis, Documentary record, Ecological survey, Place names, Iconography – Woodland in the ancient past in Ireland and Wicklow – Woodland cover in Wicklow in recent centuries – Visitors’ and commentators’ views on the woodland resource – Woodland cover clues from maps and surveys – Sixteenth and seventeenth century maps and documents – Seventeenth century surveys: The Civil Survey (1654-56), Seventeenth century Shillelagh land resource surveys, Other seventeenth century documentary sources, Survey of the Meath estate 1679 – Eighteenth century surveys: Woodland surveys of the Watson-Wentworth-Fitzwilliam estate (Coolattin estate) 1724-1764 – Miscellaneous eighteenth and nineteenth century maps and paintings: Bayly estate maps, Ballyarthur 1700 and 1810, Tighe estate, Rosanna, Ashford 1756-1820, Jacob Nevill map of Co. Wicklow 1760, Updated Nevill map 1798, Jacob Nevill map of the Powerscourt demesne 1763, Downshire estate maps, Blessington 1785-1806, Early nineteenth century estimate of woodland area (Fraser 1801), Evidence from eighteenth and nineteenth century paintings – The Ordnance Survey 1835-40 – 1841 Census of Ireland – Nineteenth and twentieth century photographic evidence of woodland – Twentieth century surveys: John Nisbet survey 1903 – Woodland expansion and transformation in the twentieth century – Summary – [Section 2. Tree planting over the centuries] Background to tree planting – Legislation on tree planting – The plant hunters – Eighteenth and nineteenth century planting initiatives: The Dublin Society, Tenant tree planting in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Tenant tree planting under the Tree Registration Scheme 1788-1905, Estate tree planting in eighteenth and nineteenth centuries- Watson-Wentworth-Fitzwilliam estate, Tighe estate at Rosanna, Ashford 1718-1874, Downshire estate-the Coronation Plantation, Planting at Charleville estate, 1840’s onwards, Kilmacurragh, Killruddery estate, Powerscourt, La Touche, Bellevue, Mount Usher and Glencormac Gardens, John Nisbet survey (nineteenth century estate planting) – Planting in the twentieth century: The Avondale initiative 1905-1915, Other recent twentieth century initiatives – [Section 3. Woodland industries] Introduction – Timber-using sectors: Ship building, House building and firewood, Pipe and barrel staves for the provision trade, Bark for tanning leather, Charcoal and iron smelting – Woodland business at Watson-Wentworth-Fitzwilliam estate in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: The estate, Woodland business, Trespass and protection of the coppices, Summary, The twentieth century at the Watson-Wentworth-Fitzwilliam estate – Woodland business at the Tighe estate, Rosanna, Ashford — Woodland business at the Powerscourt estate, Enniskerry — Woodland business at the Ballyarthur estate, Avoca Valley — Woodland business at the Castle Howard estate, Avoca Valley — Woodland business in Wicklow in the twentieth century – Epilogue – Appendix 1 – Appendix 2 – Appendix 3 – Index.

WW Connection #1: Some of the key areas referred to in the text include Kilbride, Russborough, Tulfarris, Rathsallagh, Oakwood, Humewood and Coolattin.

Extra #1: Check Libraries Ireland for this publication.

Extra #2: Check OCLC WorldCat.org for this publication in libraries worldwide.

Extra #3: Includes several colour photographs, maps, other illustrations and tables.

 

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